Special Online Issue of Slavic Review Available with Free Access

Publishing Date: 
Tuesday, August 1, 2017

ASEEES announces e-publication of a Special Online Issue of Slavic Review on Cambridge Core.

The online issue features two Critical Forums: “Global Populisms” and “Russian Influence in 2016 U.S. Presidential Election.”  Announcing the special issue, Slavic Review editor Harriet Murav notes in the Cambridge Core blog, “The news media can provide up to the minute information. The special August 2017 online issue of Slavic Review does something else. We offer perspectives, contexts, and reflections that both deepen and broaden the daily news feed. The August online issue has two parts, one devoted to the Russian influence on 2016 US presidential election and the other, global populism. Both tackle the causes and consequences of political shifts nationally and globally.” 

We, in partnership with Cambridge University Press, are delighted to provide free access to the special online issue until October 1, 2017, after which ASEEES membership or subscription will be required to access the issue.  There will not be print copies of this issue.

Please contact your institution’s librarian and make sure your library subscribes to Slavic Review or request a subscription.  Subscription info can be found at: www.cambridge.org/core/journals/slavic-review/subscribe 


Slavic Review Volume 76 Issue S1 

CRITICAL FORUM: Global Populisms 

Anna Grzymala-Busse

Global Populisms and their Impact
Anna Grzymala-Busse 

“Neoliberalism is Fascism and Should Be Criminalized”: Bulgarian Populism as Left-Wing Radicalism
Venelin I. Ganev

Taking Far-Right Claims Seriously and Literally: Anthropology and the Study of Right-Wing Radicalism
Agnieszka Pasieka

Draining the Swamp: Understanding the Crisis in Mainstream Politics as a Crisis of the State
Abby Innes

CRITICAL FORUM: Russian Influence in 2016 U.S. Presidential Election

Harriet Murav

Trump, Putin, and the Future of U.S.-Russian Relations
Peter Rutland

Kompromat Goes Global?: Assessing a Russian Media Tool in the United States
Sarah Oates

Red Scares and Orange Mobilizations: A Critical Anthropological Perspective on the Russian Hacking Scandal
Julie Hemment

Exclusionary Egalitarianism and the New Cold War
Brian Porter-Szűcs